The Poetry Place

From spelling test to verse

Sunday, 13 September 2009 10:34:20

Sunday, 13 September 2009 10:34:20
You better shout

If the dress suits you
If you don't burst out
If it fits you well
You'd better shout.

If your watch keeps time
If it's not far out
If your time's your own
You can jump and shout.

If your spuds have grown
If the their leaves are out
If your time's your own
Better jump and shout...

If the train's on time
Don't hang about
If the signal is green
You'd better shout.

Hurrah!   I've just found a copy of Black's Rhyming and Spelling Dictionary (edited by none other than Pie Corbett and Ruth Thomson) which is just the ticket (pick it, cricket, stick it) and that gave me the idea for 'hang about'. It's a breath of fresh air after my Penguin Rhyming Dictionary which I use rarely. It's very through - but too thorough, really.  And the likelihood of wanting to rhyme ticket with tunicate or affricate is minimal.


Tuesday, 8 September 2009 16:34:19

Tuesday, 8 September 2009 16:34:19
The last little bit has given me a pattern for a simple rhyme:

If the dress suits you
If you don't burst out
If it fits you well
You'd better shout.

If your watch keeps time
If it's not far out
If your time's your own
You can jump and shout.

If your spuds have grown
If the their leaves are out
If your time's your own
Better jump and shout...

I haven't found a way to include this part yet:
If the train's on time
If the signal is green
You'd better shout.


September Spelling

Monday, 7 September 2009 15:50:47

Monday, 7 September 2009 15:50:47
The dress fits well.  The train was on time. If you shout, he'll hear you. My watch is fast. Potatoes are grown in the field. Our kitchen is small.

(You can guess which ones are part of the spelling test/text, or can you?)

The dress fits the ticket-collector well. The train was on time. If you shout, she'll hear you. My watch is fast so I caught the train. Potatoes are grown in the field next to our house. Our kitchen is small but we can cook potatoes.

If the dress fits well
If the dress suits you
You'd better shout.
If the train's on time
If the signal is green
You'd better shout.
If your watch keeps time
If your time's your own
You can jump and shout.
If your spuds have grown
If the their leaves are out
If your time's your own
Better jump and shout...

I feel something slightly surreal coming on. But we'll see what tomorrow brings.






September

Thursday, 3 September 2009 14:39:51

Thursday, 3 September 2009 14:39:51
I came across a 'Wrat3' spelling test a little while ago. No idea what that means but the words, in increasing level of difficulty , range from 'go' to 'mnemonic'. I wondered how far it would be possible to incorporate the words, and even perhaps the lttle sentences they give as examples, into a poem.

It starts like this:

Children go to school.
The cat has fur.
The boy plays ball.
Jenn can run fast.
They will wait for you.
Mother will cut the cake.
His arm hurt.

Not very inspiring, I realise. (And oddly the only name in the whole 40 sentences is 'Jenn'.  No matter.) 

Children go to school; they will wait for you.
The cat has fur and the boy plays ball.
Jenn can run fast but she will wait for you.
Mother will cut the cake but
She won't eat it all.
His arm hurt. He hurt it in a fall.

Is this going anywhere?  What about when I get to 'Congress made an appropriation for schools'?







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